laughing-treees:

irish-carbomb:

After hiking for twelve hours out of a nineteen hour trek, it was time to watch the sunrise at Dinosaur Ridge. When we first looked out, the mountains were completely covered by clouds, but within an hour the clouds dropped and this was what we saw. It felt like heaven, and you could hear everyone present for this moment screaming and shouting for joy! I’d never seen something so incredible, I had to meditate and have gratitude to have experienced this. Some locals said that they’d never seen the mountains like this, even in their 40+ years of hiking there. (© Ka Ram Shim/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest)


so beautiful my god

laughing-treees:

irish-carbomb:

After hiking for twelve hours out of a nineteen hour trek, it was time to watch the sunrise at Dinosaur Ridge. When we first looked out, the mountains were completely covered by clouds, but within an hour the clouds dropped and this was what we saw. It felt like heaven, and you could hear everyone present for this moment screaming and shouting for joy! I’d never seen something so incredible, I had to meditate and have gratitude to have experienced this. Some locals said that they’d never seen the mountains like this, even in their 40+ years of hiking there. (© Ka Ram Shim/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest)

so beautiful my god

(Source: The Atlantic, via nyxxisnite)

rollership:

 fastcodesignOn Tuesday, a bonsai tree boldly went where no bonsai tree has gone before.

multidimensional-beingAzuma Makoto, a 38-year-old artist based in Tokyo, launched two botanical arrangements into orbit: “Shiki 1,” a Japanese white pine bonsai tree suspended from a metal frame, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, lilies, hydrangeas, and irises.

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Me: *during sex* ....i think i hear someone coming....

girl: ....who?

me: MEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE *bust nut*

anarcho-queer:

Researchers Successfully Eliminate HIV Virus In Human Cells
July 25th, 2014
A scientific first from Philadelphia, that could pave the way toward curing HIV. 
Instead of suppressing and treating HIV and AIDS, which is what currently happens, researchers have for the first time shown they’ve found a way to destroy the virus.
It might not look like a typical operating room, but in a lab at Temple’s Center for Neurovirology researchers are performing surgeries on genes.  Welcome to the front lines of genetic surgery. They’ve found a way to operate on DNA and destroy the AIDS virus.
“It’s an important finding because for the first time in laboratory setting we show that the virus can be eradicated from human culture, cell culture," said Dr. Kamel Khalili, who led the research team. They developed molecular tools that can hunt down and delete HIV in cells.
“Basically converting infected cells to un-infected cells and that is very important because the current therapy can not eliminate the virus from cells,” said Dr. Khalili.
Dr. Khalili showed a slide with a cell infected with HIV, highlighted in green. Then he showed another slide where the HIV is gone, the result of Temple’s gene surgery.
“We have a cure for HIV elimination. We have a system to eliminate HIV from the cells in the laboratory,” said Dr. Khalili.
Now the next step is to find a way to move the discovery from the lab into animals then people, the groundwork being set for curing HIV.

Thirty-three-million people have HIV. One million are in the United States. Every year 50,000 Americans contract the virus.

anarcho-queer:

Researchers Successfully Eliminate HIV Virus In Human Cells

July 25th, 2014

A scientific first from Philadelphia, that could pave the way toward curing HIV. 

Instead of suppressing and treating HIV and AIDS, which is what currently happens, researchers have for the first time shown they’ve found a way to destroy the virus.

It might not look like a typical operating room, but in a lab at Temple’s Center for Neurovirology researchers are performing surgeries on genes.  Welcome to the front lines of genetic surgery. They’ve found a way to operate on DNA and destroy the AIDS virus.

It’s an important finding because for the first time in laboratory setting we show that the virus can be eradicated from human culture, cell culture," said Dr. Kamel Khalili, who led the research team. They developed molecular tools that can hunt down and delete HIV in cells.

Basically converting infected cells to un-infected cells and that is very important because the current therapy can not eliminate the virus from cells,” said Dr. Khalili.

Dr. Khalili showed a slide with a cell infected with HIV, highlighted in green. Then he showed another slide where the HIV is gone, the result of Temple’s gene surgery.

We have a cure for HIV elimination. We have a system to eliminate HIV from the cells in the laboratory,” said Dr. Khalili.

Now the next step is to find a way to move the discovery from the lab into animals then people, the groundwork being set for curing HIV.

Thirty-three-million people have HIV. One million are in the United States. Every year 50,000 Americans contract the virus.